CTRC Fact Sheet Index

TenantNet note: These Fact Sheets were published by CTRC in the mid-1990's. Some information will be out-of-date. As far as we know, there have been no updates to these fact sheets. While much of the information may still be valid, the reader should exercise caution.

CTRC Fact Sheets -- reproduced with permission.
================================================================

The Community Training Resource Center (CTRC) is a city-wide not-
for-profit organization that champions the rights of modest and
low-income tenants and promotes the preservation, improvement,
and expansion of affordable housing. CTRC provides training and
technical assistance for neighborhood housing groups, community
based organizations, legislative staffs and social service
providers.

CTRC produces fact sheets on tenants' rights, develops and
publishes research reports, and provides a written guide to New
York City government processes. CTRC advocates on budget policies
that affect housing and related services in low-income
neighborhoods. CTRC has led the campaign for the improvement and
expansion of the city's Housing Maintenance Code inspection and
enforcement services.
================================================================

CTRC Fact Sheet #104

NEW YORK CITY HISTORICAL RENT GUIDELINES SUMMARIES

----------------------------------------------------------------
This chart is formatted for 72 columns and is best displayed in a
monospace font such as courier. The reader is advised the
following is only a summary of percentages applicable to vacancy
and/or renewal leases.  In any given period there may be
applicable supplements and exclusions which depend on the rental
history of the unit in question. For specific methods of
calculating allowable RGB increases for any given period, consult
the notes accompanying this chart and also with the full-text of
the specific order.

This chart was compiled from data provided by:

     NYC Rent Guidelines Board
     51 Chambers Street #202
     New York, NY 10007
     Tel (212) 349-2262

     NYC Conciliation and Appeals Board (defunct)

     Community Training and Resource Center (see below)
     47 Ann Street
     New York, NY 10038
     Tel (212)964-7200
     Fax (212)227-1125

----------------------------------------------------------------

NEW YORK CITY HISTORICAL RENT GUIDELINES CHART

(numbers in parentheses refer to footnotes which must be
consulted in the calculation of the guidelines)

See below for additional allowances for electrical inclusions,
subletting and separate stabilizers.


NYC RGB   Affecting leases    1-year    2-year    3-year     Vacancy
Order No. starting between    lease     lease     lease     allowance

1          6/1/68-6/30/70     10%(1)     10%       15%     5%-2yr lease
                                                          10%-3yr lease

2          7/1/70-6/30/71       6%        8%       11%         7.5%

3          7/1/71-6/30/72       7%        9%       12%     See note(2)

4          7/1/72-6/30/73       6%        8%       10%     See note(2)

5          7/1/73-6/30/74      6.5%      8.5%     10.5%    See note(2)

6,         7/1/74-6/30/75      8.5%     10.5%      12%         None
6a,6c(3)

7(3)       7/1/75-6/30/76      7.5%      9.5%     12.5%         5%

8(3)       7/1/76-6/30/77      6.5%       8%       11%          5%

9          7/1/77-6/30/78      6.5%      8.5%     11.5%         5%

10(6)      7/1/78-6/30/79      3.5%      5.5%      7.5%         5%

10a            (same)          4.5%      6.5%      8.5%         5%

10b(7)         (same)          2.5%       2%       0.5%        ---

10c(8)         (same)               $12 per month              15%

10d(9)         (same)                $8 per month              ---

10e(10)        (same)                $8 per month              ---

11         7/1/79-6/30/80      8.5%      12%       15%        5%(11)

11a(l2)        (same)                $8 per month              ---

11b(l2)        (same)                $8 per month              ---

12         7/1/80-9/30/81    11%(13)   l4%(l3)   17%(13)      5%(14)

13        10/1/81-9/30/82    l0%(l5)   l3%(l5)   16%(l5)     l5%(16)

14        10/1/82-9/30/83       4%        7%       10%         None

15(17)    10/1/83-9/30/84       4%        7%     n/a(l8)       0/5/
                                                            10/15%(19)

16(20)    10/1/84-9/30/85       6%        9%       n/a         7.5%

17(21)    10/1/85-9/30/86       4%       6.5%      n/a         7.5%

18(22)    10/1/86-9/30/87       6%        9%                   7.5%

19(23)    10/1/87-9/30/88       3%       6.5%                  10%

20(24)    10/1/88-9/30/89       6%        9%                   12%

21(25)    10/1/89-9/30/90      5.5%       9%                   12%

22        10/1/90-9/30/91      4.5%       7%                  5%(26)

23        10/1/91-9/30/92       4%       6.5%                 5%(26)

24        10/1/92-9/30/93       3%        5%                  5%(26)

25        10/1/93-9/30/94       3%        5%                0/3/5%(27)

26(28)    10/1/94-9/30/95       2%        4%                  5%(29)

27(30)    10/1/95-9/30/96       2%        4%                   8.5%

28(31)    10/1/96-9/30/97       5%        7%                    9%

----------------------------------------------------------------

Additional Allowances:


RGB              Electrical     For               For separate
Order Number     Inclusion      subletting        stabilizer

1                None           same as vacancy   none
2                None           7.5%              1%
3                None           10%               1%
4                None           5%                1/2%
5                None           5%                none
6a,6c            2.5%(4)        none              1/2%
7                3.5%           5%                none
8                3.5%(5)        5%                none
9                4.0%(5)        5%                none
10,10a           0.5%           5%                none
10b              --             --                 --
11               None           5%                none
12               1.5%           5%/10% (14)       none
13               4.0%           15%               none
14               Minus 1%       none              none
15               Minus 1%

(for subsequent orders, see full text of RGB orders)

For information pertaining to Fuel Surcharges, Fair Market Rent
Appeals, Senior Citizens Rent Increase Examption (SCRIE), Lofts
and Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Hotels, see full text of RGB
orders.

----------------------------------------------------------------
Notes below must be consulted in the calculation of the
above guidelines.
----------------------------------------------------------------

The information in this chart may be used as a reference for rent
adjustments to be found in the registered rent history obtainable
from the New York State Division of Housing and Community Renewal
(DHCR). This chart is not intended to determine if an overcharge
exists before filing an overcharge complaint (Form RA-89) with
DHCR. Because many factors besides the guidelines come into play,
it is strongly recommended that tenants not try to determine the
legal rent by themselves. Instead, they should file an overcharge
complaint with the DHCR both to determine the legal rent for the
apartment and the possibility of an overcharge. It is the
stabilized tenant's right to pay no more than the legal rent.

[Note: any determination of overcharges will only be effective
for the four years prior to the filing of a complaint with DHCR,
and the awarding of treble damages will only apply to two years
prior to filing the complaint.]

A separate factsheet on the current Rent Guidelines Board Order
is available. It gives more detail on how guideline adjustments
may be applied.

----------------------------------------------------------------


Notes

1    Tenant could request and obtain a one-year lease extension
     at the same rental.

2    Vacancy destabilization was in effect between 7/1/71 and
     6/30/74.

3    For some apartments which had been vacancy decontrolled or
     destabilized the following guidelines (Orders 6, 7, and 8)
     were also subject to guideline limitation formulae further
     limiting the increase in rent.

4    For lease which commenced between 9/1/74 and 6/30/75.

5    Collectible only if the landlord did not collect an electric
     inclusion allowance previously.

6    Superseded by Order No. 10a.

7    Fuel surcharge effective 3/1/79 collectible for the duration
     of the lease; not to become a part of the base rent.

8    Fuel surcharge of $12 a month effective 1/1/80 through
     6/30/80 for all leases executed under Order 10, 10a, and
     10b. This surcharge, and the surcharge Of Order lOb,
     requires a lease rider in the current lease permitting the
     landlord to collect surcharges made by the Rent Guidelines
     Board after the effective date or the lease. The 15 percent
     vacancy allowance is effective 2/1/80 through 6/30/80,
     applying only to vacancy leases commencing within that five-
     month period.

9    Supersedes Order 10c; effective for one year from 7/1/80
     through 6/30/81. The $8 may not be added to the base rent
     for the purpose of calculating future rent increases of any
     kind. This surcharge requires a lease rider as explained
     above in footnote 8.

10   Supersedes Order 10d, but continues 10d's $8 a month fuel
     surcharge until the expiration of the lease.

11   Superseded by Order 10c that was actually adopted on a later
     date than Order 11. The effect was to hike the 5 percent
     vacancy allowance in Order 11 to 15 percent effective in the
     final five-month period of this order, as explained in
     footnote 8 above.

12   Fuel surcharge of $8 a month effective one year from the
     commencement day of leases commencing between 7/1/79 through
     6/30/80. By definition, this surcharge can only affect
     multiple-year leases in their 2nd and 3rd years. As in Order
     10c, requires authorizing lease rider.

13   For one-, two-, and three-year leases respectively, 5, 7,
     and 9 percent if the tenant's heat is not supplied by the
     landlord.  Note that this guideline period is fifteen
     months.

14   Vacancy allowance may be 10 percent if vacancy lease being
     executed is the first vacancy lease since July 1, 1975.

15   For one-, two-, and three-year leases respectively, 6.5,
     9.5, and 12.5 percent if tenant's heat is not supplied by
     landlord.

16   This vacancy allowance was ordered effective three months
     early, on 7/1/81, seamlessly continuing the 15 percent of
     Order 10c. Many tenants were hit in these two periods with
     two vacancy allowances plus two guidelines, raising the rent
     50 and 60 percent making a mockery of the term
     "stabilization." Later challenged, the courts upheld these
     hikes.

17   For rentals under $200 a month on 9/30/83, the landlord is
     allowed to add $10 to the rent after applying the guideline
     increase of 4 or 7 percent, so long as the resulting rent
     does not exceed $208 for a one-year, or $214 for a two-year
     lease.

18   Effective 10/1/83, the landlord was no longer required to
     offer a three-year lease. The law that deleted the three-
     year lease option extended the right of choosing a one-, or
     two-year lease to tenants signing a vacancy lease (renewing
     tenants always had this right), and stopped the Rent
     Guidelines Board from adopting surcharges after the setting
     of the annual guidelines.

19   Vacancy allowance (VA) applies as follows: 0% if 15% VA or
     more has been collected since 7/1/79; 5% if less than 15%
     but more than 0% VA has been collected since 6/1/79; 10% if
     the last VA collected was between 7/1/75 and 6/30/79, 15% if
     no VA has been collected in any guideline period since
     7/1/74.

20   For rentals under $250 a month on 9/30/84, the landlord is
     allowed to add $10 to the rent after applying the guideline
     increase of 6 or 9 percent, so long as the resulting rent
     does not exceed $265 for a one-year, or $272.50 for a two-
     year lease.

21   For rentals under $300 a month on 9/30/85, the landlord is
     allowed to add $15 to the rent after applying the guideline
     increase of 4 or 6.5 percent, so long as the resulting rent
     does not exceed $312 for a one-year, or $319.50 for a two-
     year lease.

22   For rentals under $350 a month on 9/30/86, the landlord is
     allowed to add $15 to the rent after applying the guideline
     increase of 6 or 9 percent, so long as the resulting rent
     does not exceed $371 for a one-year, or $381.50 for a two-
     year lease

23   For rentals under $325 a month on 9/30/87 the landlord is
     allowed to add $10 to the rent after applying the guideline
     increase of 3 or 6.5 percent, so long as the resulting rent
     does not exceed $334.75 for a one-year, or $346.13 for a two-
     year lease.

24   For rentals under $325 a month on 9/30/88, the landlord is
     allowed to add $5 to the rent after applying the guideline
     increase of 6 or 9 percent, so long as the resulting rent
     does not exceed $344.50 for a one-year, or $354.25 for a two-
     year lease.

25   For rentals under $325 a month on 9/30/89, the landlord is
     allowed to add $5 to the rent after applying the guideline
     increase of 5.5 or 9 percent, so long as the resulting rent
     does not exceed $342.88 for a one-year, or $354.25 for a two-
     year lease.

26   The vacancy allowance may be only collected once during the
     October to September guideline period.

27   Vacancy allowance for rents below $500 is 5.0%, for rents
     between $500 and $1000 it is 3.0%, and for those above
     $1000, it is 0%.

28   For rentals below $400 as of 9/30/94, in buildings of 30
     units or less, add $15 surcharge after guidelines increase.

29   The vacancy allowance is 5% for rents under $1000. In
     buildings of 30 units or less where the rent is less than
     $400, the vacancy allowance is 10%.

30   For rentals $400 or less as of 9/30/95, add $20 surcharge
     after guidelines increase.30

31   For rentals $400 or less as of 9/30/96, add $20 surcharge
     after guidelines increase.

================================================================

These article are Copyright 1995 and 1996 by Community Training Resource
Center (CTRC) and reproduced by TenantNet. Additional information in
this particular article were compiled by TenantNet. They may be freely
redistributed in their entirety provided they are reproduced exactly
as in the originals, including this copyright notice, the opening and
closing informational banners and any references to either CTRC
or TenantNet must be included.

These article are provided as is without any express or implied
warranty. While any information in these article is believed to be
correct at the time of writing, these articles are for educational
purposes only and do not purport to provide legal advice. If
you require legal advice, you should consult with a legal
practitioner licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.

Community Training Resource Center                (212)964-7200
47 Ann Street
New York, NY 10038

================================================================
TenantNet - the online resource for residential tenants

TenantNet is not an apartment referral service or brokerage,
is not associated with any government agency, political party
or ideology. The information is believed to be accurate and is
for informational purposes only. TenantNet cannot act as
attorneys and makes no representations, expressed or implied,
that the information can or will be used or interpreted in any
particular way by any governmental agency or court.
================================================================

TenantNet Home | TenantNet Forum | New York Tenant Information
DHCR Information | DHCR Decisions | Housing Court Decisions | New York Rent Laws
Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us

Subscribe to our Mailing List!
Your Email      Full Name