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Is it the property manager's responsibility to address this?

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Is it the property manager's responsibility to address this?

Postby kc1291 » Sat May 20, 2023 8:22 am

I live in an apartment in Upstate, NY. There is alot of greenery around the apartment. Lots of patches of green grass. There are areas where people sit outside on the grass and there are tons of areas that are just green grass areas since this is in the country. I am talking right on the apartment complex property.

Dogs need to toilet themselves outside, right? No problem! I noticed that some people toilet their dogs on the "lawn" areas where people sit in chairs and at picnic tables. They do clean up after the dogs if it fecal matter.

I asked the property manager if she would send out a memo asking people to please try to use the areas of the property that aren't used by tenants for toileting their dogs. My main reason for doing this is because walking or sitting on the grass that is also used by dogs isn't such a cool thing.

There are no specific rules about where dogs are to be toileted here.

The property manager is very reluctant to do send out such a memo and I am not sure why. I did ask her and she said "I can't "make" them do that. People here don't listen to me". I am not sure if she can "make" anyone do anything, but common rules at apartment complexes usually exist.

Is it the property manager's responsibility to address tenants with dogs toileting their dogs in certain locations on the property? There is nothing in the lease about it.
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Re: Is it the property manager's responsibility to address t

Postby TenantNet » Sat May 20, 2023 11:23 am

Being upstate, you are unregulated, and any rights and responsibilities you have are spelled out in your lease, or NYS statute or case law.

In NYC we have the Pooper Scooper law where dog owners must pick-up doggy doo-doo after the deed. But in your case, you're on private property.

I don't see why the manager would be reluctant, but the thing is, there is no law requiring them to do anything. Of course they can if they desire to do so. But as she points out, how would one enforce it? We have the same problems with uncaring dog owners allowing their dogs to pee in tree beds ... the urine is not good for trees and flowers. You can encourage, but that's about it.
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Re: Is it the property manager's responsibility to address t

Postby kc1291 » Sat May 20, 2023 12:06 pm

Thank you for your information and reply.
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Re: Is it the property manager's responsibility to address t

Postby TenantNet » Sat May 20, 2023 12:32 pm

Here's some thoughts on this... you don't say where upstate you are, but the only city that has rent regulation is Kingston (and that's still in the courts)..

The other alternative is what's being called "Good Cause Eviction," which has not even passed in Albany. Our view is that it's a hoax and bad policy, much weaker than real rent regulation. All over the country rent regulation is being adopted, but not in NY, in some ways thanks to bad choices by groups pretending to fight for tenants. Remember,real rent regulation tends to keep rent increases more reasonable, but it also guarantees a lease and services, which Good Cause does not.

What I'm thinking is that you and several others form a garden or beautification committee. That would not be threatening to the LL (we hope), after all, what you want to do is plant some flowers, who can argue with that?

Ask the LL to set some of the land aside for a garden. You can get into composting, maybe make it a true community garden where people have a portion of their own to grow their own fruit and veggies.

Take your time and drop hints about the dog issue, but among tenants (not the LL) and in a non-threatening way. You can be educational. You could organize Easter Egg hunts in the spring for kiddies. People will start to take ownership of "their" garden and lawn. Sure, it's a bunch of work, but you might like it, and maybe solve the doggie problem.
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